Also called Upper GI endoscopy or simply endoscopy, it is a non-surgical procedure performed to examine the upper part of the digestive tract; the oesophagus (food pipe), stomach and duodenum (the first part of your small intestine. Most endoscopy procedures use an instrument called an endoscope. An endoscope is a long, thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end

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Why do an Upper GI endoscopy?

 An Upper GI endoscopy is performed to detect inflammation, ulcers or early cancers of the Upper Gastro-intestinal tract. It is also used to treat some conditions like bleeding ulcers, removal of gastric polyps or stretching narrowing's in the food pipe or oesophagus. Gastroscopy is also used to obtain biopsies where tumours or infections are suspected.

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How should I prepare for the Gastroscopy?

You would need to be fasting for about 6 hours prior to the procedure. In addition please inform your doctor if you are taking any blood thinning medication. If you are diabetic, please take your normal medication the previous evening. However delay your diabetic medication or any other medication on the day of the procedure. You may safely take them after the procedure after discussing with your Gastroenterologist. 

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What happens during the procedure?

You can choose to have the procedure with a simple throat spray, or have sedation as well. If you chose sedation, please ensure you have some one to escort you back home that day. The procedure itself will take only a few minutes and is not painful. You will need to lie on your left hand side during the procedure. Your doctor will gently insert the endoscope through the mouth. A nurse will be there to assist in the procedure throughout the examination.

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 What happens after the procedure?

It is important to remember that an endoscopy procedure is a very simple test. You will be given the report shortly after the procedure. However biopsy reports may take up to a week to be reported. Remember, most people do not require biopsies.  

A colonoscopy is a non-surgical test used to examine the lining of your large bowel (also called the Colon). This is done using an endoscope, which is a tube about the thickness of a finger, with a camera and light at one end. It is gently passed through the back passage and carefully moved around the large bowel. It also allows taking samples if need be or removing small bumps, called polyps from the intestine. 

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Why do a colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is done to look for any abnormality of the large bowel like Ulcers, Tuberculosis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease or even Cancers. It can also be used to treat conditions like bleeding from the intestine or removal of polyps, that may be pre-cancerous. In fact, bowel screening by colonoscope is the most successful cancer screening programme in the world. 

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How should I prepare for the Colonoscopy?

To make sure the doctor has a clear view of your colon, it must be completely empty. Therefore, you will be asked to follow a special diet before the procedure. You will have to take a laxative for the test, details of which can be found here.

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What happens during the procedure?

This test is normally performed with sedation. The test itself only takes about 15 minutes. You will be asked to lie down on your left-hand side on a couch with your knees bent. The colonoscope will then be inserted into your lower bowel through your anus. Air will be passed down a channel in the endoscope, expanding your bowel. This may make you feel slightly bloated. If polyps are present, your endoscopist can remove these. You will not feel this.

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 What happens after the procedure?

If you have had sedation, you will need to rest quietly after the procedure. If you choose to have sedation, you must arrange for a relative or friend to take you home. The doctor will often be able to tell you your results before you leave the hospital. If you have had biopsies taken the results may take up to 7 days to become available.

Gastroscopy

Colonoscopy